Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Transformers 4 Confirmed

Michael Bay has confirmed that work has begun on Transformers 4.

"We are at the inception of our story process right now on T4."

At this point all that's known is that Bay will be directing it, Ehren Kruger will be writing it, and that Mark Wahlberg will be the star.

Expectations are for it to start right where Transformers 3 left off and that it will have an entirely new human cast.

He says that internet rumors are what actually decided him on going forth with the project.

80,000 Protest Austerity in Athens

As a crowd of over eighty thousand marched through Athens, Wednesday night, things turned violent.

The marchers were protesting another round of austerity measures, being voted on by parliament.

They tried storming the parliament building, throwing gas bombs as police, engulfing at least one officer in fire.

Police retaliated with water cannons, tear gas, and stun grenades as they fought not just to defend parliament, but their own lives.

Injury reports are not yet coming in, but there are reports of fires and smoke in many parts of the city.

The planned austerity measures would cut 13.5 billion euros (17.4 billion dollars) in order to get a further loan from the European Union, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund of 31 billion euros (nearly 40 billion dollars).

Recreational Marijuana Legalized, But Not Really

Tuesday saw several states vote on whether or not to legalize various levels of marijuana.

Colorado and Washington both voted to allow for the recreational use of the drug, while Oregon voted against it.

In Arkansas voters rejected allowing medical marijuana, whilst in Massachusetts they decided to legalize it, and in Montana they added restrictions to their current medical marijuana laws.

Despite the legalization in Colorado and Washington, a heavy fight is still ahead. The federal government still considers it illegal.

The Drug Enforcement Administration released a statement saying, "Enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act remains unchanged. In enacting the Controlled Substances Act, Congress determined that marijuana is a Schedule I control[ed] substance. The Department of Justice is reviewing the ballot initiatives and we have no additional comment at this time."

Now the drug becomes even more of a state's right issue. Because of that it may find new supporters, amongst those who voted against it.

There are many people who voted no on legalizing recreational use, who also will fight to keep it as they see the federal government as trying to interfere too much in state's rights.

For now, it may be listed as legal, but authorities will continue to carry out arrests for using the drug, until such time as the Supreme Court decides on the matter.

A decision which is nowhere near even being scheduled yet.

7.4 Quake Kills 48 in Guatemala

A 7.4 earthquake struck Guatemala, Wednesday morning.

It occurred one hundred and one miles southwest of the capital, Guatemala City.

At least forty-eight people were killed, with hundreds more injured.

Government offices in the state of San Marcos were amongst the buildings totally destroyed by the quake.

Two thousand soldiers have been called up to help with the relief and search and rescue efforts.

The quake was felt throughout Central America and as far north as Mexico City, around seven hundred and fifty miles away.

Missing Texas Teen's Body Found

The body of missing sixteen year old, Alicia Moore, was found Tuesday afternoon.

Alicia had last been seen Friday after she got off the bus from school, in Greenville, Texas.

A construction crew happened upon her body inside of a furniture trunk, about sixty miles from her home, along Highway 47.

By Wednesday, the medical examiner had confirmed that it was her body.

It is unknown what happened to her after she got off her bus, til the time she was killed.

Anyone with information should call the Greenville Police Department at 903-457-2900.

Colorado Police Searching for Man Who Shot at Cops

Police in Colorado are looking for a man who took shots at three officers, in two separate incidents.

Just after midnight, Tuesday morning, two Denver police officers pulled over a vehicle for a traffic stop.

When they approached the car, they were fired upon.

As they took cover, the driver sped away.

The scene was repeated Wednesday morning, for a Westminster officer.

Both agencies reported the vehicle as a silver or grey, four door 2000 Cadillac Deville.

Westminster police said it had red trim on the back and a temporary license, while Denver officers said it had black tinted windows and a South Dakota license plate, 49CAR9.

The suspect is described as a Hispanic or Native American male, approximately mid 20s to 30s with long dark hair.

Blue to Gold: ARMY Pfc Brandon L Buttry

ARMY Pfc Brandon L Buttry, nineteen, of Shenandoah, Iowa, died November 5, in Kandahar province, Afghanistan.
The grim news about Brandon Buttry filtered to his one of a kind family in Shenandoah, Iowa, Monday.

His parents, Don and Pam Buttry, heard first. They passed the news to Brandon's thirteen brothers and sisters, a mix of biological and adopted children who hail from four different countries but for years shared the family's one bathroom. Aunts and uncles, cousins and friends and the members of Memorial Baptist Church heard the news, too. Brandon is gone, they told one another. He was killed in Afghanistan.

And then the Buttry family mourned just as they have traveled and learned math and waited in line for the bathroom. Together.

“They really are an amazing family,” said Steve Buttry, Brandon's uncle. “They are devastated. But they have a strong faith and a strong family, and they will get through this.”

Buttry, nineteen, died in Afghanistan while standing guard atop a watchtower, his uncle said.

The Department of Defense confirmed his death on Tuesday. According to the military, Buttry died in action Monday while serving in the Kandahar province in Afghanistan.

This much is certain: Brandon Buttry will be remembered by one of the largest and most close-knit families in the state of Iowa.

Don and Pam Buttry had three biological children when they saw a TV program about children starving and suffering in Romania at the end of the Cold War.

They tried and failed to adopt from Romania, so instead they adopted five children from South Korea, one child from Vietnam, one from Guatemala, three from Alabama. And Brandon, from Iowa.

There are fourteen children in all, ranging in age from thirty-six to eleven. Until the family added onto its house, Brandon shared a bedroom with several other children, his uncle said. And until the family added its second bathroom, Brandon shared it with every other member of the household.

The family trekked cross country together several times, piling off a tan passenger van in matching orange T-shirts to cheer on older sisters Missy and Mandy at their cross country and track meets. Missy Buttry became one of the best long-distance runners in the country in the early 2000s, qualifying for the US Olympic Trials and finishing eighth in the trial's five thousand meter event in 2004. She's married to Andrew Rock, who won a gold medal at the 2004 Olympics.

During the week, Don and Pam Buttry home school the adopted children, teaching reading and math to a cross cultural brood that included several children with physical and mental disabilities.

On Sundays, any child living in the Buttry household or visiting home attends services at Memorial Baptist Church, filling up a section of back pews so regularly that Pastor Mike Brogan gave it a name. The Buttry Corner.

After church, Don, a former employee of Eaton Corp., often plants himself in front of the TV and cheers on the Minnesota Vikings. So do most of his children.

But not Brandon. He rooted on the Philadelphia Eagles and trash talked his siblings.

“He had a bit of a contrarian streak in him,” said Steve Buttry, a former World-Herald reporter who is now an editor for Digital First Media. “A twinkle in his eye. A mischievous smile on his face.”

Brandon Buttry had wanted to join the US Army since childhood and discussed his decision several times with Brogan in the months before he left for boot camp in January.

“He just wanted to serve his country and make a difference,” Brogan said Monday. “He felt like joining would allow him to contribute something to America. It's probably about that simple and that complicated.”

Buttry is the 157th service member with ties to Nebraska or Iowa who has died in the post September  11 wars, according to newspaper records.

He is only the second Nebraskan or western Iowan to die in Afghanistan this year. That's down markedly from 2011, when the Iowa and Nebraska National Guards sent thousands of soldiers to that country.

But that relative lack of violence is little solace to the Buttry family.

Since Pfc. Brandon Buttry shipped to Afghanistan in August, his mother, Pam, has sent out email messages with photos and updates she's gleaned from phone calls. She has always included a reminder asking his friends and family to pray for his safety.

“I think she was always worried about getting the news that we got today,” Steve Buttry said.

Blue to Gold: ARMY Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz

ARMY Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz, 27, of Alden, New York, died November 3, in Paktia province, Afghanistan.
Army Specialist Brett Gornewicz of Alden and two other reservists were killed while inspecting an area for roadside bombs on Saturday.

Gornewicz was home on leave in August. He didn't talk much about Afghanistan, but loved spending time with his family and friends. Monday night, his close friends described the Army Specialist as a selfless person with a great sense of humor, and a special affection for the Army

Steve Zinter said, "As kids, he always had the camouflage and BB guns and dress up and run around the house doing that kind of thing."

Gornewicz, of the 444th Engineer Company headquartered in Oswego, had served a tour in Iraq before electing to go to Afghanistan.

Andrew Smith said, "He had the opportunity to give up the Army, but once he found out that some of his brothers from the previous tour were going back, he told us he wanted to go back with them."

On November 3, Gornewicz' Humvee was struck by an improvised explosive device. He and two other soldiers from New York State, Army Spc. Ryan P. Jayne from Campbell and Staff Sergeant Dain T. Venne from Port Henry, were killed. His lifelong friends in Alden have taken it very hard.

Brian Peebles said, "I couldn't feel my stomach. It just caved in, and I didn't know what to feel, so I immediately told my wife, and just kind of stared for a minute. Didn't know what to do."

Gornewicz played varsity baseball and JV football at Alden, where he graduated from in 2003, and was always described as a team player.

Andrew Bermel said, "He was a great guy. He would do anything for anybody. He always had a way to come in to wherever we were and just brighten up the spot."

Gornewicz a girlfriend, Nicole, and hoped some day to raise a family. His family is in Dover, Delaware, awaiting his final homecoming.

Blue to Gold: ARMY Spc. Ryan P. Jayne

ARMY Spc. Ryan P. Jayne, twenty-two, of Campbell, New York, died November 3, in Paktia province, Afghanistan.

The body of Army Spc. Ryan P. Jayne will not be returned home to Steuben County for four to seven days, his father said Tuesday. “We’re hoping it will be on the short end,” Paul Jayne said.

Jayne’s body was flown to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware on Tuesday. Once Jayne’s body is returned home, there will be a viewing in Corning, Paul Jayne said. Jayne’s body will then be cremated, his father said.

Jayne, a 2008 Corning East graduate, was one of three upstate soldiers killed Saturday by an improvised explosive device in Paktia province, Afghanistan. Also killed were Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne, twenty-nine, of Port Henry, and Spc. Brett E. Gornewicz, twenty-seven, of Alden. All three men were assigned to the 178th Engineer Battalion, 412th Theater Engineer Command in Oswego.

“His mother and I should not have to bury our oldest child ... There is no more honorable, dignified way to go than serving your country,” Paul Jayne said Monday.

Jayne served as a combat engineer and a driver. His crew cleared roads and hunted IEDs.

Jayne lived with his brother in Canisteo and was recently home on a ten day leave. He left to return to Afghanistan late last month.

Blue to Gold: ARMY Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne

ARMY Staff Sgt. Dain T. Venne, twenty-nine, of Port Henry, New York, died November 3, in Paktia province, Afghanistan.

Port Henry resident Dain Venne was killed in Afghanistan Saturday while serving with the U.S. Army Reserve. Venne, 29, was on patrol when a roadside bomb exploded, according to preliminary reports. Two other soldiers died with Venne when the bomb went off. His parents are Brian and Laura (Harris) Venne of Port Henry. His father is a longtime Moriah town justice. Laura is a teacher at Moriah Central School. Dain Venne was with the U.S. Army 10th Mountain Division headquartered at Fort Drum, but reported to the Canton-Oswego U.S. Army Reserve Training Center. He had served one tour in Iraq and the current one in Afghanistan. The family was notified Saturday afternoon, according to friends. Venne was a graduate of Moriah Central School and was a student at St. Lawrence University in Canton when the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred. He enlisted in the U.S. Army soon after, friends said, in an effort to serve his country in a time of need.

Read more: http://sgt-jim.blogspot.com/2012/11/rip-staff-sgt-dain-t-venne-spc-ryan-p.html
Port Henry resident Dain Venne was killed in Afghanistan Saturday while serving with the US Army Reserve.

Venne, twenty-nine, was on patrol when a roadside bomb exploded, according to preliminary reports. Two other soldiers, Army Specialist Ryan P. Jayne and Army Specialist Brett Gornewicz died with Venne when the bomb went off.

His parents are Brian and Laura (Harris) Venne of Port Henry. His father is a longtime Moriah town justice. Laura is a teacher at Moriah Central School.

Dain Venne was with the US Army 10th Mountain Division headquartered at Fort Drum, but reported to the Canton-Oswego US Army Reserve Training Center. He had served one tour in Iraq and the current one in Afghanistan.

The family was notified Saturday afternoon, according to friends. Venne was a graduate of Moriah Central School and was a student at St. Lawrence University in Canton when the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred. He enlisted in the US Army soon after, friends said, in an effort to serve his country in a time of need.
Port Henry resident Dain Venne was killed in Afghanistan Saturday while serving with the U.S. Army Reserve. Venne, 29, was on patrol when a roadside bomb exploded, according to preliminary reports. Two other soldiers died with Venne when the bomb went off. His parents are Brian and Laura (Harris) Venne of Port Henry. His father is a longtime Moriah town justice. Laura is a teacher at Moriah Central School. Dain Venne was with the U.S. Army 10th Mountain Division headquartered at Fort Drum, but reported to the Canton-Oswego U.S. Army Reserve Training Center. He had served one tour in Iraq and the current one in Afghanistan. The family was notified Saturday afternoon, according to friends. Venne was a graduate of Moriah Central School and was a student at St. Lawrence University in Canton when the 9/11 terrorist attacks occurred. He enlisted in the U.S. Army soon after, friends said, in an effort to serve his country in a time of need.

Read more: http://sgt-jim.blogspot.com/2012/11/rip-staff-sgt-dain-t-venne-spc-ryan-p.html